Necessary Distance: Paintings by Kevin Marcoux

Anderson-Foothill
tags: Art Exhibits

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  • Necessary Distance

Necessary Distance
Paintings by Kevin Marcoux
Reception: Thu, Feb 6, 7pm

ARTIST'S STATEMENT
People who claim to know say Petrarch was the first person to go up a hill just for the pleasure of the view. Whether or not he was the first, in the not too distant past people had no conceptual framework for “just looking at” something for the pleasure of the view. To see a vista as a self-contained object of beauty, requires in some sense the making of an artifact. To look out from a vantage point on a hill and see in the land beneath an aesthetic object requires a reconceptualization of the vista as not just an arena for human plans, desires and actions, but as something to be beheld apart from its ordinary role as a substratum for human activity. The ability to find the “necessary distance” to bring this dual perception into existence interests me. I feel a similar epiphany underlies the aesthetic experience resulting from the dual awareness of a painting as both a depicting representation and a painted object. I am trying to discern and document the visual cues made of color, contrast, texture and temperature that support the dual aesthetic response in me and perhaps others. In some sense I am exploring and visually documenting the mark-making required to create the necessary distance to appreciate the marks on a canvas as both painterly object making and as constituents of a depicting representation.

People tell me that my paintings are “quiet”. If this is true I suspect it reflects that I am drawn to the formal, visual properties of an image, rather than any narrative content it might carry. I don’t see the point of painting a “visual essay”. Words not only suffice, they better fit the task of teaching or declaring. What I find visually interesting concerns how painted marks can simultaneously form a self-sufficient, abstract and non-representational painted object while also joining as a gestalt that can depict objects and evoke a chain of visual associations and feelings that seldom hang together in the neat and purposeful manner of linear or purposive art forms built of texts or temporally sequenced performances or narratives.

Location: Anderson-Foothill

Contact Information: 801-594-8611