Building Peace in the 21st Century: a Reading/Discussion Group

Corinne and Jack Sweet

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  • Tanner Center

Each year, the Barbara L. and Norman C. Tanner Center for Nonviolent Human Rights Advocacy at the University of Utah sponsors programs aimed at promoting community discussion of human rights, peace, and conflict resolution. This year, as we approach the centennial of the start of the first global war, we are examining new challenges to peace in the 21st century. In collaboration with the Salt Lake City Public Library, we will host a series of reading/discussion groups, each focused on a particular challenge to peace.

WAR, JIHAD, AND RECONCILIATION
Tue, Jan 14
The entanglement of religion with political conflict has obviously been a profound challenge to the international order over the past two decades. Can we creatively address these conflicts and even find common ground and resources for peacebuilding in religion?

Discussion Leader: David Derezotes, Director, Peace and Conflict Studies Program, University of Utah

Readings:
Douglas M. Johnston, "U.S. Foreign Policy and the Muslim World”, address to the Evangelicals for Peace Summit, Washington, DC, September 2012.

Mohammed Abu-Nimer, “Conflict Resolution, Culture, and Religion: Toward a Training Model of Interreligious Peacebuilding”, Journal of Peace Research, 38:6 (2001).


COMPLETE SCHEDULE OF EVENTS



ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
Tue, Nov 12
Climate change has created a new set of conflicts for international relations. How can we promote economic development for poor nations when rising incomes are likely to increase carbon emissions? How do we deal justly with the fact that climate change has a greater impact on the lives of some peoples, including indigenous communities within the US?

Discussion Leader: Tariq Banuri, Department of City and Metropolitan Planning and Department of Economics, University of Utah

Readings:
Sivan Kartha, Tom Athanasiou, and Paul Baer, “The North-South Divide, Equity, and Development – The Need for Trust-Building for Emergency Moblisation”, Development Dialogues, No. 61.

Rebecca Tsosie, “Indigenous Peoples and Global Climate Change: Intercultural Models of Climate Equity”, Journal of Environmental Law and Litigation, 2010.



ECONOMIC GLOBALIZATION, INEQUALITY, AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Tue, Dec 10
Economic globalization – the increase in the flows of money, labor, and goods across borders – has helped to improve living conditions in some circumstances but has had more negative effects in others, at least in the short term. It has also created new sources of inequality and international tension around the regulation of multinational firms and the flow of profits (and taxes). Join us for a screening of the documentary film Stealing Africa, which examines these issues in the context of the mining industry in Zambia.

Stealing Africa, a documentary by Why Poverty?, examines how multinationals work the tax system and operate in Africa. The film focuses on Glencore, operator of copper mines in Zambia. Zambia has the 3rd largest copper reserves in the world, but Glencore's copper mines in Zambia are not generating a large bounty of tax revenue for the country, nor do they generate much wealth for Zambians. But they do make some people in Switzerland very rich.

Discussion Leader: TBD



WAR, JIHAD, AND RECONCILIATION
Tue, Jan 14
The entanglement of religion with political conflict has obviously been a profound challenge to the international order over the past two decades. Can we creatively address these conflicts and even find common ground and resources for peacebuilding in religion?

Discussion Leader: David Derezotes, Director, Peace and Conflict Studies Program, University of Utah

Readings:
Douglas M. Johnston, "U.S. Foreign Policy and the Muslim World”, address to the Evangelicals for Peace Summit, Washington, DC, September 2012.

Mohammed Abu-Nimer, “Conflict Resolution, Culture, and Religion: Toward a Training Model of Interreligious Peacebuilding”, Journal of Peace Research, 38:6 (2001).



GLOBAL ETHICAL DIALOGUES
Wed, Feb 19
Opening Keynote Address: “Beyond the Culture of Fear and Insecurity: International Dialogue and Peace in the 21st Century”
Jean-Marc Coicaud, Professor of Law and Global Affairs, and Director of the Division of Global Affairs, Rutgers University; Global Ethics Fellow at the Carnegie Council

Opening of Conference
Thomas Maloney, Director, The Barbara L, & Norman C. Tanner Center for Nonviolent Human Rights Advocacy, The University of Utah

Welcome
Michael Hardman, Chief Global Officer, Office of Global Engagement, The University of Utah

Introduction
Deen Chatterjee, Senior Fellow of Law, S.J. Quinney College of Law, The University of Utah

Reception to follow

The entire event is free and open to the public



Location: Corinne and Jack Sweet Branch

Contact Information: 801-594-8651